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DIY
#1
Thought this might be a nice new thread. John once posted about a saw horse project.

I can't find the post, but I have the original design .pdf.

I have three boys. Construction and Engineering. My expensive good tools are divvied up in three states - but lately, I've been getting new tools as Birthday, Fathers Day, or Christmas presents. No complaints.

Lately I've bee designing Jigs and DIY table tops that fit on those sawhorses and allow me to use individual tools as stand up tool stations. I've designed how to cut the legs on the sawhorses with a non-inclining miter saw. Then using those sawhorses as the base for a circular saw as a table saw, for a router for a router table, for a jig saw as a band saw table. I do have a dovetail finger machine for joining some drawers I want to make, and a plan for a dado jig to make storage shelves and tool cabinet for the garage.

I have most of the hardware and fasteners: locking T-handle, piano hinges, barrel-bolts, and so on, I also bought a machine stop switch to mount on the sawhorses to run each DIY tabletop device I use.

Anyone interested?
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#2
Let's do it!    S22
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#3
(03-31-2016, 08:09 PM)John L Wrote: Let's do it!    S22

Here's the sawhorse: (Legs are 40 inches long)
[Image: 7eM81O.png]
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#4
As for sawhorses, there is more that can be added to make them more useful.  I'm collected more than a few of them.  Let me see if I can find them.

       

       

   
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
I love that added tray underneath, where you can set your power tools, etc, and not have to worry about tripping over them.

Also, a MUST is for the ability to raise and lower the top shelf.  That way you don't have to make the sawhorse all that tall.  Just make the upper part higher.  This is paramount, especially if you are going to use them with a compound miter saw.  If you are cutting something longer than the width of the sawhorse and its counter top, you will need to support the outfeed, so as to keep things stable and easy to handle.  

The sawhorse is one of the most useful tools you can easily make for your shop, office, or whatever.  Go to Pinterest and type in sawhorses and you will find a huge number of different ones.  But the two two rows of pics above are the best additives.  The sawhorses can be folded up and they can be adjusted as well.

Oh, one other important additive to put on one of the legs.  Install a plug-in outlet for at least 4-6 plugs.  You always need a plug, and the outlets are dirt cheap.  I have a whole lot of them lying around, or attached to something.  S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#6
Those look good - but I like the one that can accept 2x4's at the top. That way, I can build a stable base for a simple tabletop using 2x4's as a frame. The same emergency on/off paddle switch can be used on each tabletop, too.

Here's a simple router Tabletop to put on the sawhorses: Note the PCV slide/lock for the fence. I thought it quite ingenious when I first saw it:
[Image: Ms6L03.png]
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#7
Did I mention that I'm looking for DIY on the cheap?

I once had a great Radial Arm Saw that could tie my shoes, I think it's now in Florida. I built the stand for it out of 4x4's and I think it could have taken a direct nuclear hit and survive.

Now I'm looking for just what I need to build things without spending a fortune.
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#8
I actually used that very sawhorse design to make my compound miter saw stand.   I believe I posted it all somewhere here a few years ago, but I can't find it.  I'll post some pictures of it again.

If you look at the first pic, the indoor one, you can see how I have 'eye' screws screwed into the wooden cross boards, and they are set at a 45 degree angle.  That way the bungie cord can be easily set up.  When you are ready to put it up, and collapse the horse, you can take the rear end of the bungie cord loose, and attach it to the 'eye' screw that is also at the upper part of the horse.  You never lose the bungie cords that way.

Also, the only 2 X 4  I use in the setup is the upper cross beam.  Everything else is 1 X 4.  Its lighter that way, and just as strong.  I can stand on the entire thing and it won't collapse on me.


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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#9
Here's something else:

The upper top is demountable, along with the miter saw, which is all in one piece.  I just pick it up and store it in a cabinet.  When I am ready to use again, I just carry it out to the sawhorse, which has the 2 X 4 already put in place, and then tighten it down, as shown in the picture here.  Both sides of the table top have notches in the center, so as to let the table to fit snugly over the 2 x 4.

I have two hinged, drop-down clamp assemblies.  Note that I also use velcro where it can be hinged and fastened to the table top.  When I use it to tighten the table top to the 2 x 4 I just screw tighten it into the 2 x 4.    You can see some marks where I had tightened it previously. 

I just took a bunch of sawhorse projects, and combined several pluses into one,  for my needs. 

   
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
Here's a tabletop for Circular Saw to use as a table saw:

[Image: 5Jd51W.png]
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#11
Here's a Drill Press:

[Image: G1NrjV.png]
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#12
A drill press, and a table saw, are two things I don't skimp on. The time and effort spent on trying to build one of the two, isn't worth the effort. Both are quite reasonable on the used market. I've had my table saw since 1981, and the drill press since a couple years later. They are heavy, but something you just have to have when you need them.

Now that I have my table saw hooked up to a nice custom dust collection system, and the exhaust from the cyclone separator is vented out the back of the house, I have absolutely no dust getting loose in my basement shop. I don't know how I ever got along without it for all these years.

Did I ever show you all some pictures of my system?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#13
I don't remember your vac system - but I've looked at many of them. The latest thing on the market are remote wireless vacuum switches that turn on and off with your machine. I just hook them up to the same switch.

Maybe, in the future, I'll repossess my basement work area - but for now, I'm contemplating pulling out one car and using that space with semi-portable tools for DIY projects.
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#14
Here's one pic of the system.  I have a good many of them, but they are huge in size and I would have to downsize them.  

The thien dust separator is sitting on top of the large plastic trash, and actually sits down into it by about 11 inches, which is hidden.  The the dust collection system is a stripped down Harbor Freight dust collection system, and incorporated into the thien separator.  As the sawdust is sucked up with the 5" hose, it enters the separator and as it swirls around, 99.9% of the sawdust actually drops into the bottom of the trash container.  

Then the circling air moves to the center and upward, up the hose, and then blown out the motor's exhaust into another 5" expandable duct, and the air is shot outside.  I've looked closely and have not found any residue coming out of the exhaust pipe that leads to the outside.  It literally gets rid of everything, sawdust wise.  

   

The green extension to the tablesaw is a custom made router table which I made about thirty years ago for the table saw.  The rip fense acts as a stable base, and I clamp the upper section to it.  Also it has a vacuum hose attachment where all the sawdust is sucked up and away. 

If you look below the green extension, you can see the switch for the vacuum system.  I manually turn it on first, and then reach to the left and turn on the saw.  You can just barely see that switch, which is red and facing downward.  When I am finished, I turn the saw off first, and then take my time turning off the vacuum.  This gives it time to suck up everything and clear the pipes.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#15
Yeah, that time delay makes sense - but I'll just leave the machines running after the works is done, and let it run without any load, and then shut everything down once the sawdust clears. I did see lots of DIY Thien separators on facebook. They look easy to make.

BTW: my tabletop machines don't really have vacuum collection built in very well,  but adding some scoops should help a little. I had fully integrated vacuum systems built in with more elaborate fences - but have reduced complexity. A router table really kicks out the garbage.

[Image: d4160-acaf9ff126d492713896ec597e69253c.jpg]
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#16
(04-11-2016, 09:41 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Yeah, that time delay makes sense - but I'll just leave the machines running after the works is done, and let it run without any load, and then shut everything down once the sawdust clears. I did see lots of DIY Thien separators on YouTube. They look easy to make.

BTW: my tabletop machines don't really have vacuum collection built in very well,  but adding some scoops should help a little. I had fully integrated vacuum systems built in with more elaborate fences - but have reduced complexity. A router table really kicks out the garbage

Right now, I have updates working their way up through my reinstalled computer(the one that got hit by that ransomware manure).  As soon as I get the chance, I'll move the computer back upstairs and attach all of my four exterior hard drives where all of my photos are.  I'll show you some of the processes I went through in order to come up with my ideal thien separator.  I've gone through three different ones, before finally ending up on this one.  

That system I have now is about as close to perfect as it comes.  Almost everything, including one micron and lower, is caught in the separator, and the processed air is blown outside.  Its about as ideal as I can come up with.  

All that tiny, tiny residue was getting all over the house, leaving a collection of fine dust everywhere.  Since using this system, the air is clean, clean, clean.  Even CharlieK no longer has to work overtime to get rid of his allergies.  At one time, if he got close to me, my eyes would sting from all the crap his body was working overtime to expel.  Now, there's none of that.  I don't wheeze,  cough, or haven any allergetic reactions. 

I have one of those Sears Craftsman plug-in stations where one of the plugs will automatically run for four seconds after the other one quits.  That does a good job of clearing out the tubes, but I only have it hitched up to my chop saw outside.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#17
This
seems to work. After three demonstration vacuuming sawdust and debris, the vacuum bag is taken out and there is nothing in the bag.
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#18
You honestly don't want anything that small Bill.  If you do, it will fill up and become inefficient very quickly.  Thats why I went with the 32 gallon plastic barrel, that is frequently found on sale at Lowes, HomeDepot, and other places.  

[Image: trash-can.jpg?w=227&h=300]

The best thing about it is that you can bury a good portion of your thien separator into the top, making it more compact.  I've got to get my computer fixed because I have lots of pictures showing the steps I went through.

Also, you can drop a 39 gallon trash bag into it and when it fills, just pull it out and throw it away.   S22
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#19
Capacity is important for sure, but isn't the separator tray the main thing? Some DIY Thein YouTube videos show a disc suspended with metal rods. I should think there is an optimum space to create the separation process. If it does well, it looks like from this video that it doesn't even need to be vented to the outside. If the vacuum bag doesn't fill, what's to be dumped through a long tube into the yard?
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#20
(04-12-2016, 05:12 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Capacity is important for sure, but isn't the separator tray the main thing? Some DIY Thein YouTube videos show a disc suspended with metal rods. I should think there is an optimum space to create the separation process. If it does well, it looks like from this video that it doesn't even need to be vented to the outside. If the vacuum bag doesn't fill, what's to be dumped through a long tube into the yard?

The reason why you see rods there is because the maker wants to be able to watch the sawdust swirl around inside the separator.  It looks neat, but isn't necessary.  The wall is made up of clear plastic, so it needs to be bolted down.  That's what the rods are for.  

The outside venting issue is an ongoing thing, especially over at "LumberJocks".  For most people, venting outside isn't necessary, because the separator is in the garage, or an outbuilding.  But mine is in the basement, and I have central air, with the fan going all the time.  

Further, if you use a Hepa Filter, it will clean up particulates down to one micron.  Anything smaller can get out and circulate.  I have allergies with my advancing age, so I do not need even those tiny particulates.  The biggest beef with some is that it vents debris out and the neighbors can be bothered with it.  But I have carefully checked while the unit is working and I cannot see anything coming out, period.  Making the second stage the venting outside, is a sound practice.  I still have dust all over my basement shop, but it is all from before I installed this latest system.  

In a few weeks, I will do my annual blow out.  I rent one of those 36" industrial fans, and fit it into my basement door, where I have it sealed.  Then I open the front door, turn on the fan, which is blowing out, and then take my air compressor system's air hose, and literally blow out the entire basement.  The fan sucks out all the dust, and the basement looks slicker than snot.   S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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