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DIY
#21
I just spent the day looking at videos for building a CNC Router table. Here!

Very impressed. This one looks pretty professional for around $1400 total. The project he built in the videos was sold to a friend - Was it you, John? I wish I had one so I could build it faster. eBay and Craigslist show used ones for $2-4 K.

Here's a video that show some output.


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#22
Check this out:

[Image: 14431688101617571271.jpg]

Power 8 Workshop
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#23
No, not me. I haven't gotten into CNC routing. I have so many other things I need to get done, I'd probably never be able to get around to it.

But it is a great tool to have, if I was going to be routing a large number of same items.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#24
(04-19-2016, 08:09 PM)John L Wrote: ...But it is a great tool to have, if I was going to be routing a large number of same items.

As an artist, I think about what kind of things I could come up with. I've always considered myself more a 3D sculptor-type Artist than a pen and ink or painterly sort of guy. A CNC Router is a take-away sculpting device, where a 3D printer is a building-up sort of thing. Both seem pretty similar to me. When I was an animation director/producer, and went to schools for the parent's day "what I do for a living" speech thing, all the kids loved the idea of animation - but were taken aback when I gave examples of the math and physics required to get it right.

When I was still an animator, I took one of the same Oxberry multi-stage cameras like what Disney used (mine shot Heckle and Jeckle and Mighty Mouse), and designed and installed stepper motors and a computer program for driving them. ...Improved the animation mechanics 1800%. I had to build my own computer, monitor, and keyboard from scratch, to learn how they worked, and cobbled together a system that really worked well. But that was back in the Stone Age. Nowadays, such programs and device drivers are multi-generational and can be used by middle-schoolers without a hitch. Still need exponentional zooming with trigonometric fairings to design things that look right - but all the latest programs and hardware do almost everything for you.

I'd love to work with a machine like the CNC Sidewinder, Dave Gatton, designed - just to see what could happen. Betcha I could make a buncha nice Christmas presents!
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#25
BTW... Here's the animation Master Stand I dressed up into the leading edge of tech:

[Image: 2c_oxberry.gif]

This is pretty-much identical to what I dressed up- minus the lights, polarizing-screens, and stepper technology. I always used to say that that German machine could take a direct nuclear hit and survive. It was quite a machine.
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#26
Ok, here is my latest project.  I'm almost finished.  I just need a little touchup and minor things.

Its a planting station I have been meaning to do for over a year now.   Here's the original planter station which is on the internet.

[Image: 94d54cc2c9f23c226cb6a911f3798dc5.jpg]

This is one of the best ones I have ever seen on the internet.  It has a sink for running water, but my upstairs deck hasn't got a water connection, so I don't intend to drop in a sink at this time.  I will cut a hole in the center of the top, for dropping junk into a trash bucket.  

If you click on the attachments, you can bring up a much larger picture.

   

   

   

   

Here it's about 95% finished.  I still have to use white silicone caulk in order to fill in the cracks between the countertop and the risers on the back and two sides.   The front portion of the countertop needs a second coating of white paint in order to make it waterproof.

I have a couple of shelves to attach on the upper section.  And I will use vertical slats for the back of the lower section.   And I also have to cut a hole for the trash,  and seal the edges with paint.  

The bottom deck is an old frame that was sitting around on my outer basement deck, and is two or three years old. I had to cut it down and rebuild the ends. That's why it has an OSB sheet on it. Otherwise, I would have use slats instead.

   

After lining it up against the wall, I noticed that it doesn't look plumb.  The roof seemed to be leaning forward.  But I quickly realized that it was doing that because the deck was inclined downward as it moved away from the house.  Whew,  I began to breath better.  I went to Lowes and bought a pad for the bottom of the front legs, and that helped a bit, but the leaning is still there to see.  I'll just have to learn to live with it, I guess.   

On second thought, I probably should have redone the decking, renewing it, and then sealing the thing.   But I will get to that later, since I can always get some physical help shifting everything from one half of the deck to the other, and then doing the other half once the first half is finished.  Its amazing how filthy a new deck can look just three years after having put a brand new deck down.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#27
(05-10-2016, 05:27 PM)John L Wrote: ...the deck was inclined downward as it moved away from the house.

Did the supports sink? What made the deck start sloping. Sinkhole?
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#28
(05-10-2016, 09:16 PM)WmLambert Wrote:
(05-10-2016, 05:27 PM)John L Wrote: ...the deck was inclined downward as it moved away from the house.

Did the supports sink? What made the deck start sloping. Sinkhole?

No way.  All of the supports and concrete bases are original and over twenty-five years old.  When I rebuilt the deck, I just replaced all of the upper decking and the railing crossmembers.  Everything else was still in great shape.  

Nothing had sunk.  Remember, all decks have to be sloped downward, away from the house, so the water can flow outward, away from the structure.  Even upper decks follow this rule.  I believe the old rule is 1/4 inch per foot.  Its been so long I've forgotten.  But it is not noticeable under normal condition.  I had forgotten this rule, when I eyed the slight lean, because I know that frames have a habit of not being put together and come out completely plumb and level.  

If you look at the upper section there are only three 2 x 4 holding it all up.  There is almost a complete sheet of OSB, along with the 1 X lumber.  That adds up to some weight, and eventually over time the 2 X 4s will want to bend forward due to gravity.  I'm considering adding two 1 X 4 boards, on on each side. and screwed into the outer 2 x 4s, just to add more strength to the roof section.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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