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The Martian
#1
Its coming folks, and somehow I believe this one is going to be a Really, Really Big One. With Ridley Scott, how can it possibly go wrong, correct?

[Image: the-martian-entertainment-weekly.jpg]

I've actually had this Andy Weir novel for about two, three years now. I even had it placed on a folder on my desktop, just waiting for transfer to my Nook, but just never got around to it. I believe I am going to read it very soon. S22

But regardless, Andy Weir, is going to be a very well known writer, with this being his very first novel. And with NASA on board, he will be sitting pretty. He has had all kinds of doors opened for him already, so I'm expecting good things in the future.

[Image: c2523e90e223f8c89a67a3e33f073554.jpg]

If anyone needs a copy, just let me know.





Here's another trailer.





So, how accurate is it, really? Here's what Men's Journal is saying.

I have found so many articles about this thing, that I am just going to link to my search page, if you want to explore more about the science.



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#2
Ridley Scott is full of crap(IMO), but, he is a very talented man. Stuff like this doesn't appeal to me, but, I bet it's a blockbuster.

Wife and I were at "Black Mass" yesterday and this was the big preview subject.
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#3
This reminds me of the 2000 movie Mission to Mars starring Gary Sinise. That story also was about a mission to rescue a lone Marsnaut living in a greenhouse on Mars.
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#4
If someone wanted to live on Mars even for a short while, the best place to land would be at the bottom of the enormous Mariner Valley--which is five miles deep. The air would be much more dense at the bottom. Mariner Valley is many times larger than our Grand Canyon--on earth, it would stretch from the Atlantic to the Pacific coasts of America. And it is so wide across, in most places the walls would be below the horizon. And since the feature was obviously produced by a massive flow of water, there is probably water left below the surface, possibly pooled in huge caverns, which might be inhabitable, and accessible through caves on the valley floor.
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#5
Ron, they weren't attempting to live there. In the movie, they were there to explore, and one got left behind when the mission was aborted.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#6
John Nolte really does think well of the movie: ‘THE MARTIAN’ REVIEW: TOP-NOTCH HOLLYWOOD ENTERTAINMENT

Quote:“Apollo 13″ meets “Interstellar” in director Ridley Scott’s “The Martian,” and the result is a blockbuster piece of entertainment that matches both. Matt Damon has never been more likable as Mark Watney, an American astronaut and botanist who, in a plausible scenario, is left behind on Mars with no hope of any kind rescue for at least 4 years.

The concept is audacious, the execution flawlessly offers no shortcuts. “I’m going to science the shit out of this,” Watney promises, and that he does. As do a terrific cast of characters on the ground at NASA.

“The Martian” is one of those rare movies about smart, capable people problem-solving their way out of a seemingly impossible situation, and doing so without a Deus Ex Machina. Watney will run out of food and oxygen and water in less than 60 days. How, on a planet without all three, can he survive for years?

I just finished reading the book last night, and I must say that it is very well done. I only found one science mistake, and one irritant. Mildly off putting is the fact that there is an awful lot of four letter words thrown around. That many really didn't have to be injected. But the story line is very good and well researched, and especially for a first time author.

The one big mistake he made was in how he treated the part about Martian storms. The NASA people were talking about how terrible a 175 mph(or was it kph? I'll have to go back and check) storm would be. The truth is that the Martian atmosphere is only about 1/90th the pressure of earth. That means that a sixty mph wind would only feel like a very gentle breeze. A 175kph, or even a 175mph, storm would not be all that dangerous.

The one irritant is something that really gets to me, and Andy Weir had to be up to speed on this. And that's the use of CNN in everything news wise. "CNN Who?" There are so few watching that 'so called' news outlet that I was tempted to throw my ereader against the wall. Weir is either politically ignorant, or a real live Progressive. PeeU!

Other than that stupid, retarded CNN thing, he did a very good job. And the more I think of it, the more I am sure he really is a Left Wing Progressive. Nobody could possibly be that stupid. Gah

Anyway, if you are more forgiving, and less nitpicky than I am, you will really love the novel.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#7
Andrew Klavan is giving this film a thumbs up.

‘The Martian’ vs Environmental Defeatism

The message of this story is clear: There is nothing man can't achieve if he is willing to "science the s*** out of it."

But I still have this all important question: What the hell's CNN?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#8
I read the book then watched the movie on Blu-Ray. The book was a really excellent novel, especially since it was Andy Weir's first novel. It is always a good idea to make sure your science is as right as you can make it in science fiction. The movie was very good too, stayed close to the novel, although it omitted three disasters, probably because it would have made the movie too long. It was cool that one of the extras included fictional "interviews" with the characters that showed how things went six months and further after the Hermes returned to earth, telling what became of the various characters. It was really a continuation of the story, that went beyond the novel.
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#9
The only problem I saw was that they changed the supporting character's races around in order to make it more politically correct. Spiteful
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
(10-09-2015, 11:58 PM)John L Wrote: ...What the hell's CNN?

It might be Klingon for "unwatched purveyor of slanted news", but I can't tell you for sure, because Paramount is trying to copyright the Klingon language and I might be liable to a lawsuit.

'IwlIj jachjaj ("May your blood scream!")
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#11
I didn't notice the changing around of races. They still had a woman as crew captain Lewis--who had the terrible taste in music (Disco) and 1970's TV (Happy Days with "the Fonz"). Henry Winkler can still be seen occasionally on the USA show, Royal Pains, whenever it is on (they only seem to have about ten episodes per season).
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#12
(05-03-2016, 10:41 AM)Ron Lambert Wrote: I didn't notice the changing around of races. They still had a woman as crew captain Lewis--who had the terrible taste in music (Disco) and 1970's TV (Happy Days with "the Fonz"). Henry Winkler can still be seen occasionally on the USA show, Royal Pains, whenever it is on (they only seem to have about ten episodes per season).

One of the reasons why I noticed this is because I know Korean names, having been stationed there.  Now, the NASA mission specialist, Mindy Park, naturally had to be Korean.  The name "Park" is a Korean sir name.  For instance, the president of Korea is currently Park Geun-hye, who is the daughter of former Korean president Park Chung-hee, a general, who was president when I was stationed there.  He was later assassinated while in office.

Dad was with the 25th Infantry Division in the Korean War, and he had hundreds of pics of his time there.  I spend hours going through his scrapbook as a youngster, it was so interesting.    Also, while in country, I was immersed  into the world of the Korean people, because I was the official Korean liaison for my unit(Cold War Officer).  I spent a good deal of time smoothing out issues that naturally came up, mostly alcohol induced.  S13   I learned to eat a lot of kimchi in the process.    

In the orient, the sir name is pronounced first, instead of last in the West.  Also, the sir name "Park" is really not the correct spelling of the sound, which is really "Pak", and its 100% Korean.  Anybody, who's last name is "Park" is either Korean, or a Korean descendant, not a blond European woman like the one cast in the movie.  Many languages accent their words differently from English, just as "Pak" is changed to "Park".  For instance, in German, the letter "G" is really pronounced with a silent "ch" instead of "g".  So, pronouncing the word "German" is really a silent "Ch-urman".   Its very silent, but if one listens closely, they can tell the difference.

Also, I hadn't noticed earlier, but they also did a switch on the Punjabi fellow, Vincent Kapoor, who was not described well.  But I know that someone from India, is not a Black fellow with kinky hair.    Anyway, they could have easily found the right folks to plug into the novel-movie.  

But the Korean part is so obvious that I was totally surprised.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#13
(05-03-2016, 12:23 PM)John L Wrote: ...they could have easily found the right folks to plug into the novel-movie.

Knowing Ridley Scott, he probably took the essence of the roles and wanted someone closest to the motivation of each character - instead of following the racial makeup from the book. In a novel, it is often easy to take the measure of each character, which is sometimes in contrast to the cliché image of racial makeup. If Andy Weir approved of the casting, then the race wasn't probably a core element.
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#14
Since Andy Weir is a veteran novelist of great repute, I'm quite sure he had the power to approve/disapprove a small time director/producer, such as Ridley Scott.   Spiteful

And judging by how politically correct the Hollywood establishment is, having a few Asians would be a bit of overkill, since they represent such a high percentage of successful American, who are anything but the downtrodden.   Makes sense. S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#15
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(05-03-2016, 04:00 PM)John L Wrote: Since Andy Weir is a veteran novelist of great repute, I'm quite sure he had the power to approve/disapprove a small time director/producer, such as Ridley Scott....

Yeah, we know Scott had all the juice - but he's not semi-revered because he causes writers to hate him. The producers and directors I've worked with all had egos - but the good ones understood that causing everyone to hate them didn't do them a bit of good. Making the authors and bit players come out of the collaboration with plaudits and heightened respect did as much as good reviews to make Ridley Scott a giant in the industry.
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#16
The movie Alien made Ridley Scott a giant in the industry.
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#17
(05-04-2016, 12:04 AM)Ron Lambert Wrote: The movie Alien made Ridley Scott a giant in the industry.

His films include Bladerunner, Alien, Thelma and Louise, Gladiator, Numb3rs, Robin Hood, The A-Team, and The Martian.

He has a huge body of work as a producer.
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#18
Alien was the first, in 1979. If not for that first big Oscar-winning success, he likely would not have been given the chance to produce the later ones that came in 1982 (Bladerunner), 1991 (Thelma and Louise), 2010 (The A-Team movie), etc. The only movie listed before Alien was The Duellists in 1977. It won an award for best Debut film at the Cannes Film Festival; which served to pave the way for Ridley Scott to get to produce Alien, which made his career. Link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ridley_Scott_filmography
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