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Will Computers Replace the Teacher?
#1
Editor of Reason Magazine Says ‘Dear God I Hope So’. The days of teachers unions controlling the eduction system are about to come to an end.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=47oyCTfv6...embedded#!
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#2
It's a great opportunity for a great teacher make more money selling videos of courses he/she teaches to the public.
'It's not who votes that matters, it's who counts the votes'  |  György Schwartz, Budapest, Hungary
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#3
http://www.teach12.com

This, and the Khan Academy (google it), are widely available and having used either myself, unless you're stupid you will learn something. Teaching done by computers and interactive media/software can work.

The only problem I have is that sometime it is better to interact with the professor concerning certain scenarios or questions that arise.
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#4
Well, that's easy to correct. Just assign one extremely well qualified teacher to handle questions, should they crop up, and let the computers take care of the rest. It still eliminates all those teachers that are not needed.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#5
Hillsdale is giving the video classes away for free - and beating the pants off their competition (if any.)

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#6
There is a dynamic between teachers and students which cannot be captured by on-line teaching or by video. (I have taught at the college and graduate level for nearly 50 years.) Only the most mature, motivated and self disciplined students are capable of on-line or video learning. That means that about 98% of the population or more) are incapable of impersonal learning..

There is also the problem of testing: how does one give tests to masses of people (or distant people) and insure that there is negligible cheating and no ringers? People have ideas about this, it is not clear that this problem has been economically solved.

There are vastly charismatic and popular lecturers for online courses I am told, however among the vast numbers of students who might enroll, very few seem to stay until the end of the course.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#7
And home schooling?
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#8
In home schooling, the dynamic exists: parent and child. The source may be text or video, but there is still the interaction and questions/answers between the two. There is also the insistence by the parent that the child master the material, and not simply be "exposed" to it, i.e. watch it passively. In my opinion, home schooling is based on very personal interactions regardless of the source of information.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#9
Agreed. And that is where teachers are endangered.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#10
(04-14-2013, 04:52 PM)jt Wrote: There is a dynamic between teachers and students which cannot be captured by on-line teaching or by video...

Yes, there is, but it is two-way with a spin. A good teacher can help students learn how to learn and expand their horizons, but a bad one makes them fort up and treat education as a liability. The Detroit schools are filled with kids who don't graduate - and don't want to graduate. They see any effort as a conspiracy against them.

But what is worse, is that even the teachers who are good for getting kids to learn, often teach a progressive agenda that does them no good service. They define that old saying: "The more you learn, the less you know."
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#11
The "bad teacher" problem no doubt exists. However many schools seem to not promote a good learning environment, letting classes be disrupted and failing to discipline disruptors. Furthermore, it seems that expectations of student performance (and behavior) is low in many failing schools. Add to that the fact that may parents don't seem to care about what their child actually learns (or on the other hand complain if their child does not get a good grade), and you have a serious pedagogical mess. If the disruptors were controlled, expectations high and the parents cared about actual education, then even a modestly poor teacher might be effective. Union recalcitrance is not to be dismissed.

People in the educ biz are always looking for the Magic Teaching Method that will inculcate knowledge into K-12 brains no matter what the learning environment is. Vast amounts of "Education Research" money has been spent on this, including billions by Bill Gates. Nothing has been found. The current daydream that "computers will be the Magic Method" is just another aspect of this.

One of my liberal acquaintances told me that the problem started with women's lib. Before that, bright capable women went into teaching as an easy route for work. Now, he said, all the good ones get jobs in other fields. He forgot to mention the upsurge in the touchy-feely influence and the general decline in morality in the US.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#12
A liberal acquaintance told you that? I'd have though such a person would worry more about self-esteem and tests that "fit" the testee.

Sounds like a spurned contestant for a plum, won by a lady.

As for parents not caring what their kids learn, they are themselves the reservoirs of knowledge of that system. As long As the kids learn what they learned, why should they worry?
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#13
In my opinion, some parents are not a reservoir for much knowledge or wisdom at all. There are lots of flaky people around.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#14
No I don’t think so, teachers have their own place and there are a lot of things which a computer may not do as a teacher can do. The physical existence is more important than the virtual ones.
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#15
(05-17-2013, 06:39 AM)romavia Wrote: No I don’t think so, teachers have their own place and there are a lot of things which a computer may not do as a teacher can do. The physical existence is more important than the virtual ones.

While a good deal of this is true, the present education system is failing society and students. The computer, and internet is an obvious way to get around a lot of this shortcoming.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#16
(05-17-2013, 06:39 AM)romavia Wrote: No I don’t think so, teachers have their own place and there are a lot of things which a computer may not do as a teacher can do. The physical existence is more important than the virtual ones.

It all depends. A teacher follows a curriculum devised by others, and sometimes that teaching plan is full of nonsense and disinformation. A good teacher will challenge the challengeable and teach his/her students to learn how to learn - as much to resist nonsense as to gain knowledge in areas the student is most interested in.

By the same token, computerized courses are only as good as the persons who create the program. Good ones are well worthwhile - I give you the Hillsdale online courses as a positive example.
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