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5 Reasons Cats Are Inferior to Dogs in Every Way
#41
Here's another entry in the Cat Vs. Dog Competition:

   
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#42
Sorry cat lovers but your pet feline DOESN'T care about you!

[Image: Cats-don-t-care-owner-602991.jpg]
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#43
I can see why so many people prefer cats. According to the link "Sorry cat lovers but your pet feline DOESN'T care about you!" they can have the same attachments as dogs, but the main difference is that dogs are more needy and cats are less. This of course means that an owner who craves sycophantic behavior will prefer dogs, where someone who wants a companion and not a lackey will prefer cats.

However; I've seen dogs that are very smart and cats that are very smart. They have individual attachments to their owners that are hard to quantify. My Brandy is a Shih-tzu that can be needy one moment, and independent the next. Is there such a thing as a cat-dog?
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#44
A dog will be happy to live in your house with you.

A cat will allow you to live in your house, whether you are happy or not.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said,
but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant!
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#45
(09-07-2015, 09:57 AM)JohnWho Wrote: A dog will be happy to live in your house with you.

A cat will allow you to live in your house, whether you are happy or not.

Some breeds of dogs can live indoors happily, but most can't. They need a stake in the outside environment, and are able to live in the outdoors if necessary. Some breeds, However, like the Lhasa-Apso, are totally domesticated, and cannot live on their own outdoors. I love foxes, coyotes, and wolves, but know they are lousy pets. Cats are more like them than many dog breeds, yet still make good pets.

There are so many variations with breeds, that there is one that is probably right for anyone.
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#46
(09-07-2015, 09:03 PM)WmLambert Wrote: I love foxes, coyotes ...

I bet you wouldn't if they did this to your dogs ...

A fox probably wouldn't manage it, but locally, we've been losing lots and lots of small dogs lately. That big bastard coyote jumped a chain link fence to do his dirty work. SOBs are getting bolder. The daughter tried chasing it away but it didn't really start moving until she got a baseball bat. Broomfield has become a fairly urban/suburban area these days ... it's not out way in the sticks by any means.
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#47
Yeah, years ago, most wild foxes, wolves, and coyotes never came close to towns. Now the towns have come to them and the interaction is not always pleasant. But that's what wild is all about. We do have a baseball bat near the door when little Brandy goes out.
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#48
Here's the guy, who can solve all your problems: American Alsatian.

[Image: American%20Alsatian-watermarked-1285990712.jpg]

I met one last week, when I did an installation out in the country, just north of Durham. Stel is one Huge fellow. He must weigh between 130-150 pounds. I mean huge. At first, he let us know that he was not happy with us showing up. But he quickly decided I was one of the good guys.

I have an unusual way with dogs. I've never been bitten before, and I've been around even junk yard dogs. They can sense when a person fears them, and I just keep a "pack leader" mentality. It always works for me.

Stel could have chewed me up and spit me out. He is a magnificent fellow. The biggest problem is that his intake and outtake is huge. My Charlie is just the opposite.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#49
Stel sounds a lot like my oldest son's dog, Bear. Bear was the greatest pet ever. A huge mix, part Australian Shepherd, part Malamute. So big he was not afraid of anything, and very protective of kids and family. Of course shedding was a problem.
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#50
(09-07-2015, 10:52 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Yeah, years ago, most wild foxes, wolves, and coyotes never came close to towns. Now the towns have come to them and the interaction is not always pleasant. But that's what wild is all about. We do have a baseball bat near the door when little Brandy goes out.

I always stayed outside with the dogs (back when Benny was still alive) when I let them out to do their business when I was house sitting--and I usually brought a baseball bat out with with me. Just in case. After all, coyotes had been spotted less than a mile away. And this is fully developed suburbs of Detroit.
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#51
(09-08-2015, 05:05 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote:
(09-07-2015, 10:52 PM)WmLambert Wrote: Yeah, years ago, most wild foxes, wolves, and coyotes never came close to towns. Now the towns have come to them and the interaction is not always pleasant. But that's what wild is all about. We do have a baseball bat near the door when little Brandy goes out.

I always stayed outside with the dogs (back when Benny was still alive) when I let them out to do their business when I was house sitting--and I usually brought a baseball bat out with with me. Just in case. After all, coyotes had been spotted less than a mile away. And this is fully developed suburbs of Detroit.

There are very few wild animals that are afraid to go live in the city or suburbs. Perhaps wolves, wolverines, moose, bear, and perhaps one or two others. But the rest thrive in and amongst humans. After all, there is a world of neat snacks to enjoy. And I am not talking about pets. Trash cans, dumpsters, and whatnot, are all over the place.

And imagine some critter living in the brush, close to a restaurant, with one or more dumpsters in the back. Just think of all the scraps and tasty little morsels, just awaiting the four legged diner. And Ohhhh, those heavenly smells, they travel all over the place, just calling to one and all. And the little guys really don't have to work all that hard for a living. Ain't humans just wonderful? This is the ultimate welfare program. S13
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#52
(09-08-2015, 05:17 PM)John L Wrote: There are very few wild animals that are afraid to go live in the city or suburbs. Perhaps wolves, wolverines, moose, bear, and perhaps one or two others. But the rest thrive in and amongst humans. After all, there is a world of neat snacks to enjoy. And I am not talking about pets. Trash cans, dumpsters, and whatnot, are all over the place.

And imagine some critter living in the brush, close to a restaurant, with one or more dumpsters in the back. Just think of all the scraps and tasty little morsels, just awaiting the four legged diner. And Ohhhh, those heavenly smells, they travel all over the place, just calling to one and all. And the little guys really don't have to work all that hard for a living. Ain't humans just wonderful? This is the ultimate welfare program. S13

We don't really have that many (or any) wolves or wolverines around ... but we had a Moose walking around the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder earlier this summer. And dozens of 'problem' bears in Boulder. Some idiot shot two cubs in his back yard a week or two ago. I expect that the city will have him publicly flayed over it. People come here and move to the foothills and mountains and are total idiots about how they store their trash. Very bad for bears ... and (potentially) fatal for humans. I kid you not. A friend at work has (humanely) trapped no less than 11 raccoons that were tearing up his garden before he finally gave up ... again in Boulder. I think they've also lost a large number of small dogs there this year ... although most of that is happening in the north central burbs. The Lambert's vigilant baseball bat plan is an excellent idea if you have one of the smaller breeds.
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#53
(09-08-2015, 11:35 PM)mr_yak Wrote: The Lambert's vigilant baseball bat plan is an excellent idea if you have one of the smaller breeds.

What also helped is that most of the neighbors also had dogs, some of them pretty big, which the coyotes would have to go through first (plus all the chain-link fences) to get to little Benny and Brandy. And they had a human with them in the same yard.

My two cats (late lamented) never went outside. They were perfectly content to remain indoors. They were raised that way. My sister's cat is used to going outdoors, and meows piteously if we don't let her out. But we don't let her out until it is good daylight, and we bring her in to stay before it gets dark. (We have seen a fox a few houses down in our neighborhood.) She has gotten so she generally stays close to the house. She is getting older, and sleeps alot. Even when she is outdoors.
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#54
[Image: IMG_2854.jpg?resize=487%2C490]
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#55
How precious! I need to find a hat that states "All Labs Matter". Wouldn't that be neat? S22
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#56
(09-12-2015, 04:03 PM)John L Wrote: How precious! I need to find a hat that states "All Labs Matter". Wouldn't that be neat? S22

It is a thread about canines is it not?
"Democracy is the theory that the common people know what they want and deserve to get it good and hard."
-- Henry Mencken
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#57
(09-12-2015, 07:56 PM)mr_yak Wrote:
(09-12-2015, 04:03 PM)John L Wrote: How precious! I need to find a hat that states "All Labs Matter". Wouldn't that be neat? S22

It is a thread about canines is it not?

It certainly is. Before I got on this Shih-Tzy thing, I had a huge American black lab, named of all things "Captain Black", after the pipe tobacco I used to smoke a long time ago. He was the most laid back, lovable guy. The Captain could clean off a coffee table in a couple of seconds with that happy tail. And fart!? Oh lord, he could pass the silent sliders.

I've got to special order a ball cap that has that "All labs matter"
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#58
Here's a French bulldog, doing what cats do naturally. S5



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#59
I know Lhasas are well known for taking on any beast that intrudes onto their property. They are totally domesticated and can't survive on their own, but know no bounds when it comes to protecting their homestead.

I kinda feel bad about the lil bulldog chasing off the two hapless bear cubs. Brazen bruins, for sure, but they looked cute.
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#60
I'm also waiting on the first feline cancer detector program. Spiteful



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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