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5 Reasons Cats Are Inferior to Dogs in Every Way
#21
Here is yet one more reason why I love dogs so much.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#22
Here's an interesting article from the Smithsonian:

Are Cats Domesticated? There is little genetic difference between a tabby and a wild cat, so scientists think the house cat is only domestic when it wants to be.

Quote:Scientists say there is little that separates the average house cat (Felis Catus) from its wild brethren (Felis silvestris). There’s some debate over whether cats fit the definition of domesticated as it is commonly used, says Wes Warren, PhD, associate professor of genetics at The Genome Institute at Washington University in St. Louis.

“We don’t think they are truly domesticated,” says Warren, who prefers to refer to cats as “semi-domesticated.”


The African wildcat,Felis silvestris lybica,

[Image: african-wildcat.jpg]

Now, let's see someone try this with a cat. S13



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#23
People who have lived on farms know that regular house cats can be wild and feral if they are left more or less to fend for themselves. They are often called "barn cats." They may not go out of their way to attack you, but they will seldom let you pet them. They are great at controlling the mice and rats in the barn and barnyard, so farmers put up with them.

By the way, John, just to quote from a movie I saw some time ago, "Cats rule, dogs drool!" S1
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#24
(08-07-2015, 11:28 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: People who have lived on farms know that regular house cats can be wild and feral if they are left more or less to fend for themselves. They are often called "barn cats." They may not go out of their way to attack you, but they will seldom let you pet them. They are great at controlling the mice and rats in the barn and barnyard.

That's probably how cats got started with humans. They just probably followed the food source, and the rodents wound up going after the stored grains of the early farmers.

As far as domestication goes, there really hasn't been much done with cats. There is some selective breeding going on, and I'll bet some of the specialized breeds are more people oriented. But the average run of the mill cat, tolerates humans. No domestication really. I'm surprised that there isn't some real push for domestication of cats.

But cats do have one major disadvantage over dogs. With the exception of lions, cats are solitary animals. But dog's wolf ancestors were highly social and lived in packs. So they had the concept of togetherness ingrained. This made it easier for a small minority to be willing to come into close proximity with humans.

But the big key is this. It seems that all canis have a gene that is quite easy to mutate. The silver fox experiment in Russia clearly shows how they too can be tamed over a short time. I watched a program some years ago, and this gene was explained in it. But I have forgotten which one. That's why dogs can be molded and shaped into any basic specialized need.

Here, watch this. Its only 10 minutes and is quite informative.





As for the "Cats rule", S13 . The only time they could rule is when a human allows themselves to be ruled. They are too unorganized and solitary. Are you part of that group? Spiteful
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#25
This is interesting:











___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#26
Here is a good comparison of dogs and cats:

   
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#27
In all justice, though, my cat Watson used to crawl up onto the bed beside me, lay his head and paws on my arm, gaze up into my eyes purring, and sleep with me for an hour or two, almost every night. Both my cats would come when I called them. They liked to climb up on my shoulders while I was sitting in front of my computer. They were rather big and heavy cats, especially Sherlock, but they purred, so I did not mind the distraction.

When Watson was dying at the age of 20, no longer eating, he picked a place on a rubber mat in front of the kitchen sink where he chose to ly for his last days. Once in a while though, he would bestir himself to get up and walk a long distance to his litter box, because he knew I did not want him to mess on the floor. Toward the end, he would have to stop and rest along the way, there and back. The last time he did that, he breathed his last about an hour later, after making his way back to the place in front of the kitchen sink. I will always honor Watson for those last heroic efforts to please me.
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#28
Yeah, there are always exceptions to every rule. It would be nice to be able to find the best examples and then use their DNA to pass along to the next generation. Unfortunately, most of the time the animals have been neutered already.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#29
I wonder if those domesticated silver foxes would be accepted by the AKC as a new breed? They look to be great pets.
I've always had an affinity for foxes, coyotes, and wolves. My Shih Tzu, Brandy, may howl like a wolf ocassionally, but she'll never be mistaken for one.
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#30
(08-09-2015, 01:50 PM)WmLambert Wrote: I wonder if those domesticated silver foxes would be accepted by the AKC as a new breed? They look to be great pets.
I've always had an affinity for foxes, coyotes, and wolves. My Shih Tzu, Brandy, may howl like a wolf ocassionally, but she'll never be mistaken for one.

Not sure. Remember, foxes are not dogs. Dogs are from the genus Canis. Foxes are a bit different. For example the red fox, along with most other foxes, is of the genus Vulpes The gray fox however, is of the genus Urocyon, and to the best of my knowledge they cannot interbreed.

I suppose if we are finally able to breed enough foxes that we need to have them kept in kennels, then why not have them admitted. After all, that's what the "K" in AKC stands for. S22
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#31
The Russian genealogist said all domesticated dogs of today probably came from a certain wolf. I wonder if my Brandy came from that wolf. She may be part owl. She can turn her head like one.
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#32
(08-09-2015, 08:58 PM)WmLambert Wrote: The Russian genealogist said all domesticated dogs of today probably came from a certain wolf. I wonder if my Brandy came from that wolf. She may be part owl. She can turn her head like one.

I doubt that. I just posted a nice article on another "Dog Evolution" thread that has been around for five years. Its a very good explanation, but I added a bit more to it, when taken from an anthropological perspective.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#33
And no matter which is smarter, it really doesn't matter in this case: Note On Dog’s Body “We Beat It To Death LOL”

My guess is that the kids will not be able to keep it a total secret, and will be 'found out'. The worst thing is that kids, who kill pet animals, have a very high tendency to become serial killers.



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#34
Ron, this is just for you. Enjoy S22



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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#35
Cats tend to have faster reflexes, and those front claws are something to be reckoned with!
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#36
Its probably due to them being 3/4 wild, with just enough domestication to fool almost everyone. Spiteful
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#37
Next, lets find some domesticated Wolverines.
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#38
The Michigan State Spartans claim they have domesticated the Michigan Wolverines. S5
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#39
(08-22-2015, 05:04 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: The Michigan State Spartans claim they have domesticated the Michigan Wolverines. S5

You mean "Tamed"? There is a difference. S5
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#40
Doesn't matter to me... I graduated from UofM, but the Sparty Sport scholarships got my kids in there, so we wave that two-sided flag all the time when they play. Not so much Ohio State.
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