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Afghanistan War Is Unwinnable
#61
Well, the Afghanistan war *is* winnable. Its just a matter of picking one of the various ethnicities to suppress the others.
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#62
But then you have to arm and support that ethnicity/faction/tribe. All the other ones will get really angry and fight that tribe since the chosen tribe is a tool of the Crusader.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#63
When did the Crusades ever reach Afghanistan?
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#64
I don't know that the Crusades ever reached Afghanistan. However, it seems that all belligerent Islamics like to use the Crusades as a tool to incite the local natives against the West.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#65
Because perhaps Islam tends to think as a massive collective entity? I mean, Serbs fought Bosnian Muslims but also managed to encounter Yemenese, Saudi's, and other Muslim types who made their way over there to fight the jihad. Same with Chechnya.
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#66
(08-28-2011, 01:04 AM)Anonymous24 Wrote: Well, the Afghanistan war *is* winnable. Its just a matter of picking one of the various ethnicities to suppress the others.


Not that simple.


"Of all this information, the most troubling concerns the duplicitous double dealing by Pakistan's powerful spy agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence, or ISI. While some of the intelligence seems wildly implausible (surely the ISI did not plot to poison Kabul-bound beer, an enormously complex operation with limited pay off since US troops are not allowed to drink alcohol in Afghanistan), the WikiLeaks documents show a continued relationship between the ISI and the Taliban. This is not surprising. In the 1990s, the ISI helped create the Taliban and Pakistani support was decisive to the Taliban's capture of Kabul in 1996. The US has known since 2001 that Pakistan did not break its ties with the Taliban as President Pervez Musharraf had promised President Bush. After all, Mullah Omar and his close associates have been in Pakistan since 2001 and it is not plausible that Pakistan did not know where any of them were."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/...iban-nexus




I've said the above for years and "lefties" roasted me as best they could over it, mostly because they needed to pretend that the Taliban are "freedom fighters". I couldn't be happier that it's their loved wikileaks that is handing them the truth they can't swallow.

...and now you have this:
"KABUL, Afghanistan — The U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan on Wednesday blamed the Pakistani-based Haqqani network for the co-ordinated attack against the American Embassy and NATO headquarters in the heart of Kabul."

http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/TopStories/201...TO-110914/

And you can bet they were basically sent by the ISI. Pakistans investment in Afghanistan won't be ingored by them. They need to insure a pro-Pakistan Afghanistan and not a pro-India one.

We will all leave Afghanistan. We will all return within 15 years.




Edit, to wit:
"Numerous U.S. officials have also accused the ISI of supporting terrorist groups, even as the Pakistani government seeks increased aid from Washington with assurances of fighting militants. In a May 2009 interview with CBS' 60 Minutes, U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said "to a certain extent, they play both sides." Gates and others suggest the ISI maintains links with groups like the Afghan Taliban as a "strategic hedge" to help Islamabad gain influence in Kabul once U.S. troops exit the region. These allegations surfaced yet again in July 2010 when WikiLeaks.org made public (NYT) a trove of U.S. intelligence records on the war in Afghanistan. The documents described ISI's links to militant groups fighting U.S. and international forces in Afghanistan. In April 2011 during a visit to Pakistan, U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Admiral Mike Mullen pointed to ISI's links with one such group, the Haqqani network. "
http://www.cfr.org/pakistan/isi-terroris...ons/p11644
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#67
Take an unexpected page from the Clinton/Obama manual on dealing with terrorism. Realize that the terrorist cadre that causes all the problems is directly similar to big-city gangs in the U.S. The numbers are not huge, but they can disappear under their mothers' aprons to blend in with the crowd to avoid retaliation or justice. Taking out the money they need to move around was a large part of Bush 43's war against them. The main strategy is short-term survival and minimization of their societal affect, but the long-term strategy must be education and the cessation of enablers.

Military to stop them. Society to change them.
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#68
Maybe we were too harsh on Junior and Obama... it seems that they have successfully eradicated at least one cult in Afghanistan. S6
Sodomia delenda est

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#69
(10-11-2011, 03:58 PM)mv Wrote: Maybe we were too harsh on Junior and Obama... it seems that they have successfully eradicated at least one cult in Afghanistan. S6

Well that definitely adds to the final score board.

Is anyone keeping 'tab'?

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#70
Wow, this made it totally worth it. Good know we accomplished something. I was about to wonder where the light at the end of the tunnel was.
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#71
So will either of the Lambert's finally realize how much damage being "brotherly" has done for Christians in Afghanistan? I guess in the long run this brings about Jebus's return so probably not.
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#72
I don't think they are really embracing democracy that well either and stuff.
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#73
http://www.investors.com/NewsAndAnalysis...ligion.htm
Sodomia delenda est

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#74
Here's something that is simply beyond belief,.........right?

Nato success against Taliban in Afghanistan 'may be exaggerated'

I am almost constantly reminded of the wall poster, years ago, showing a group of hippos standing around with their mouthes wide open. And under the picture are the words, "After All Is Said And Done, There Is A Whole Lot More Said Than Done".
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#75
Reading through the article, I am less than impressed by the impartiality of those doing the "study".

Yet, it reminds be of the body counts of the Vietnam war. Which side is propagandizing?
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#76
US forces 'massing on Afghanistan-Pakistan border'

Quote:The scale of the American build-up, including helicopter gunships, heavy artillery and hundreds of American and Afghan troops, caused panic in north Waziristan where tribal militias who feared they could be targeted gathered in the capital Miranshah to coordinate their response.

Local officials in the Federally-Administered Tribal Areas (FATA) warned that Pakistan's armed forces would repel any incursion across the border by American forces, but military sources in Islamabad and Afghan officials suggested the build-up was part of a coordinated operation.

Hmm. What is going on here? Is there new "cooperation" from Pakistan? A final Taliban cleansing in the works?

Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#77
Cooperation doesn't fit the pattern of recent Pakistani behavior.
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#78
mv Wrote:http://www.investors.com/NewsAndAnalysis...ligion.htm
IMO violence against christians or anybody else who is not from the dominant religion there, is not caused by the Arab Spring or by Nato/Us intervention.

It's caused by chaos.

You always need a stable governement to protect the minorities and everywhere this stable governement collapsed, locals become rogue and violent, burning houses and churches of poeple they don't like. It's always the most intolerant and most radical among the locals who do so.

Wars and unrest are indirectly causing this, but the Arab Spring insurgent never had any intent for this to happen.

And in Afghanistan, how many christians are still living there?

JL Wrote:Nato success against Taliban in Afghanistan 'may be exaggerated'
This is the whole question about how we define victory.
As long as there will be a single taliban alive, it will be considered as a defeat.
IMO the work of weakening the Taliban by the US forces has been tremendous. It's an extremely difficult task, in a very difficult environement.

Weither it's winnable or even weither we make progress shouldn't be part of the equation.

The only question is "do we keep the figth against the ennemies of civilisation or not (or do we deem them weak enough to ignore them)?"

Given the last US build-up in Waziristan, the answer is "yes". And the US is decided not to be treated like a fool by the ISI any more.
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#79
http://news.yahoo.com/afghanistan-back-p...16217.html
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#80
Yeah I read that too...
Wierd because the afhan military is serious about fighting the taliban (at least they get killed).

But the mere idea to talk about an imaginary war between pakistan and the US is disconfortable.
At some point it will be time to leave Afghanistan too.
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