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Pure Green Coffee Bean Extract
#21
By the way, you will not believe the many, and varied, ways people will go in order to make that perfect roasted coffee. Some use hot air popcorn poppers, Stir-Crazy popcorn poppers with convection oven toppers, washing machine dryer motors, and many others. Its amazing once you start looking around. I did an extensive search, knowing that I already had all these green coffee beans I was grinding into powder for taking on a daily basis, all in the pursuit of losing some weight. So why not use the green beans for more than one thing, right?

Here's some of the ways people go about making this into a real fetish.









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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#22
I have two blade grinders, one an old West Bend and a newer Cuisinart. I've never used the Cuisinart, because the old one works just fine. I think a burr grinder would do for your pill-making. A blade-grinder pulverizes the beans rather than grinding it consistently. A Turkish grind seems to be what you need for filling the gelatine capsules.

Here is a $60 Cuisinart burr-grinder.

[Image: 8397.jpg]

When I make coffee, I must like less robust coffee, because I rarely use more than 4 scoops of beans for a whole coffee pot. It tastes fine for me, but then, I add quite a lot of caramel-vanilla creamer to get my dairy content - because I don't drink milk. I get Kona coffee from Sam's Club, and that tastes better than any other flavors I've tried. My Cuisinart 14-cup drip coffee-maker was $40 at Costco - and I saw the exact same model at Target for $99.

I think taste buds are like eyesight or hearing - something that differs from person-to-person. I wonder if my strawberry tastes like your chocolate? We also learn what pleases us. Most etnhic-Indians put curry in everything, yet I can barely tolerate it.

I think I'll try your technique for grinding the green coffee beans. Getting the capsules and filler-machine seems the most costly part, but still a lot cheaper than buying them ready-made.
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#23
Bill, I don't advise you using that burr grinder to grind up green coffee beans. Green beans are not as tough as rocks, but they just as destructive to the grinder. If you don't use a mill like this one, or the one I have above, it may well burn up your equipment. And remember, a grinder and a mill are not the same thing.

If you just absolutely have to use that sweet little thing above, fine. But if you decide to go with the more primitive means, I have this to offer.

My complaint with the one I have is that I cannot adjust the opening of the two milling heads, as with the cheaper ones. Remember, you will have to pass your green coffee beans through the mill many times in order to get them in flower form. And you will also need a good cordless drill, that allows you to use force and rpms to turn the crank. My 18V Ryobi has two Lithium Ion battery packs and a hand tightened chuck. The hand chuck is not what its cracked up to be, because the two grinding heads have to float since the beans are not tiny. I am constantly pulling back and pushing forward on the drill, in order to crush the beans into smaller pieces. This means the hand tightened chuck comes loose and has to be frequently tightened again.

And this takes a good deal of experience. In other words the learning curve is high at first. I also use a mesh colander that fits my favorite old pot. I use it to filter out the larger material, and pass it through the grinder again. I've gotten very good at this, but it takes a bit of patience and the right mill/grinder. Your beautiful thing above might wind up in the trash if you try to seriously use it to make green coffee bean flour. This is the reason why green coffee bean extract is so expensive. Its hell on the equipment.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#24
I understand what you've said about the green beans being too tough for blade grinders, but burr grinders come in all specifications, and there is no doubt that the more expensive ones are designed to do the job - because that is what the medical supply companies use. I don't know the cutoff point, though: if a $60 burr grinder will do the same job that a $300 one does. That sausage grinder you show in the pictures seems pretty coarse to me. Cast iron is not as hard as stainless steel, and some of the burr grinders use surgical steel. But I don't know and you've been there, so I defer to your judgement.

I figure the proper tool for the job is always the best way to go, and don't think we need to redesign something that already exists. For me, that means finding the threshold between cost and quality. You get what you pay for - but sometimes a cheaper tool can do the job just as well as one with toots and whistles.

I'm curious about roasting the green beans, though. From all I've read, the green beans are quite bitter, and get better tasting as they mature. I've never had green bean coffee, so have no reference.
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#25
The best place to go is to Sweet Marias Coffee. The site specializes in high quality coffee beans from all over the world, and they are more into customers who roast their own coffees. They do offer roasted coffees, but are partial to the home roaster.

The list of top quality green coffee beans are quite extensive. And if you want to get a good idea of what customers will go through to invent their own roasting methods, go check out this page. Somehow I like the idea of using my already existing counter oven to be used for more than one thing.

But I am coming to the conclusion that I am going to need to take the oven outside, every time I roast a batch of coffee. There is a good deal of smoke created in the roasting process, so I'll have to see how my first rotisserie roast comes off. It may be that the BBQ grill, and drum roasting are just as practical. One of the Youtube videos above shows an example of this.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#26
All this hassle and process is reminiscent of how people make drugs.
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#27
In this case we are satisfying our caffeine addiction, and getting the best taste out of it.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#28
Not to get off the subject, but it is true that the senses of various people differ. About 20 years ago I was on a nature hike with a bunch of people from my church (about eight people), which included Karen, who would later be my wife. One of the people in our group who was knowledgeable about wild flowers pointed out something just off the path she called a "Carrion Flower." It looked a little like Queen Anne's Lace, but it actually smelled like an outhouse. Really bad. Like it must depend upon flies for pollination. That is how it smelled to everyone in our group--except for Karen. She said it smelled "sweet." She was quite serious--like most people, she regarded her own perceptions as definitive, and simply could not believe others smelled it so differently. Of course, the senses of smell and of taste are closely related, even intertwined to some extent.
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#29
That's correct Ron. Some of us, including myself, have a very acute sense of smell. For instance the town of Cary frequently dumps large amounts of chlorine into the water supply, resulting from a couple of deaths a few years ago. The instant that fortified water comes out of my spigot, or commode, I can smell it immediately.

I've brought this up to several people, and not one of them tells me that they have ever noticed it. But to me its as though someone just opened a bottle of Clorox and poured it around. Just like those bleached coffee filters: I don't enjoy using them in my coffee making because I can really taste, and smell, the bleach.
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#30
(11-11-2012, 10:40 PM)Ron Lambert Wrote: ...it is true that the senses of various people differ.

That must be correct, or else why do some people buy skunk scent because they like it?
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#31
John L, we use a pitcher that has an activated charcoal filter, for all our drinking water. Activated charcoal is great at removing chlorine from water. Detroit City water is not too bad--better than the water in most municipalities in the U.S. But still I am vaguely aware of the chlorine taste. The filter pitcher makes a real difference.
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