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What are you Reading?
#41
WmLambert Wrote:Reading Vince Flynn, Brad Thor, and John Ringo.

I think Mitch Rapp, Scot Horvath, and Mark Harmon (Ghost) are all the same guy.

Does Ringo have a new Ghost novel?
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#42
Revolt in 2100 - Heinlein
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#43
I'm in the process of rereading John Scalzi's great novel Old Man's War. It's now a four book series, which is well written, by a young, and new, writer, who is now president of the Science Fiction Writers Association. I suspect if he lives long enough, he will attain the rank of "Master".

[Image: omlg.jpg]

Here is a review of the book.

And
, which is right up Tait's alley. Wink1
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"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#44
John L Wrote:...Does Ringo have a new Ghost novel?
A Deeper Blue is the last one I know of. Five books in the series.
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#45
Nice play John, could you just come out and quit playing games or driving jabs and stick with reviewing the book? Or we must settle to being snide while trying to be cute? I am sure you want a response and either way, you still sit atop some throne in your head.

Now I don't even care about the book, which after reading the first review, sounds like the book is recycled material from original authors.
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#46
Gunnen4u Wrote:Nice play John, could you just come out and quit playing games or driving jabs and stick with reviewing the book? Or we must settle to being snide while trying to be cute? I am sure you want a response and either way, you still sit atop some throne in your head.

Now I don't even care about the book, which after reading the first review, sounds like the book is recycled material from original authors.

Hey, I'm just having a little good clean fun. S6

And if you don't want to read it, It's your lose, not mine.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#47
The entire "Old Man's War" series is wonderful. Both I and my hubby recommend it.

I'm currently reading Blood of the Fold... Book 3 in the Sword of Truth series that was adapted (very vaguely) into a fantasy TV series.

It's not bad but there's like 12 books and they're all like 900 pages long. The author likes to paint pictures with words rather than get to the point. A lot of people like this, but for me it gets in the way of an interesting story.

Or maybe I just want to finish the damn book AND have time for WoW...
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#48
I now read a collection of essays by H. L. Menken.

He is a true wit and an independent thinker.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#49
Tait,

Are you struggling reading Solzhenitsyn?

I did a little. I think it is simply the difference in languages.

Seems like I read 2 of his books,"Gulag Archipelago" and another one I forgot it's name,the theme was him being placed in Stalin's mental system due to his opposition to Stalinism.
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#50
Struggling to read Solzhenitsyn? Are you kidding?

I enjoyed the Gulag Archipelago, Ivan Denisovich, Cancer Ward, I have all of his essays, speeches and such from his time in the US, the first two and only two published (for the moment) parts of the Red Wheel. I blew through both of them and enjoyed it immensely. I like the way Russian authors write and express themselves as well as the concept they are trying to convey to a reader, and Solzhenitsyn to me is excellent in this as well as an excellent read philosophically.

The second knot is a bit thick, deep and very laden with fact, the fictional story, background information and the Eastern Front of WW1, but it is quite wonderful regardless.

I need to pick up the First Circle next I think.

He spent 8 years as a prison laborer because he called Stalin the Prince of Thieves once in a letter. And he was a highly decorated officer in WW2.

I think if you delved into some of his other books, you'd enjoy his Christian spirituality and moral position in addition to other things quite well, such as the preservation of a culture and what it means to be a member of it. Lessons the West refuses to learn at this point. Read his speech at Harvard for an example.
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#51
Here's a challenge... I have not heard anyone ever finished Dhalgren other than me. You have to take it on faith that there is a plot line there somewhere. Samuel R. Delany wrote it in the style of James Joyce - in other words, his publishers and editors wanted to murder him. They competed for reasons not to be in the office when his galleys came in.

After Page 500, some of the weird events begin to make sense - but only if you can juggle a hundred things in your mind without forming any preconceived notions about what Delany meant until he finally gets around to tying things together. The effort to appreciate the book for the masterpiece it is, is like SEAL training. Get through that and you are a hard-ass reader. Give it up at page 200 and you're a wuss.

Closest thing to it was reading Moby-Dick, a book purposefully written in different styles. From chapter to chapter, Herman Melville moves you through a travelogue to a zoology text book to adventure to stream of consciousness to poetry to a shopping list to whatever will freak you out by the doing. (Actually, that shopping list thing was A Canticle for Liebowitz - but it sure defines Moby-Dick, too.

It is probably similar to trying to read the entire Obamacare bill - something that should be done - but can't be done without outside references and a 12-step support group.
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#52
Tait,

I had a hard time reading them.

They were all easy to understand,but, some lingual translations there is so much lost from a full/uber descriptive language such as Russki to a non descript language likes ours that I had to force myself to stick with it.

I have the same problems reading from German to English.

I read a work a while back by an Austrian Jew written around 1890. The gentleman spoke good English,but,his native tongue caused him to hack the English sentences into tiny parts,the commas about drove me nuts.

The book was so good I finished it and enjoyed it.

Right now I am reading "The City of God" written by Augustine.

I imagine it was in Latin originally and it is causing the same problems of the German Jew's book,every sentence is hacked into tiny pieces and it's hard to read. But,it's so good I will read and enjoy it anyway.

The chopped up sentnces may be translator problems or the author's bad English in the first case,don't know.

I loved all of Solzhenitysn's books,just wish I could read Russki or German or Latin instead of translations is all.
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#53
Yea, I find that some things are indeed lost in translation no matter how well you do your best to fix it.

One thing I will say about most Russian authors is that all of their books have the same *sound* to it, or what it feels like when you read it.

Plus, I share many of his concepts on religion, spirituality, the point of life, what is nationhood and justice, etc.
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#54
A truly delightful book about the origins of capitalism and freedom which took place in Medieval Europe due to the rise of merchants is:

Medieval Cities, by Henri Pirenne

First copyrighted in 1925, preceding WWII and Hayek.

The translation and prose are excellent, as are the connections to human behavior.
Jefferson: I place economy among the first and important virtues, and public debt as the greatest of dangers. To preserve our independence, we must not let our rulers load us with perpetual debt. We must make our choice between economy and liberty, or profusion and servitude. If we can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of caring for them, they will be happy.
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#55
Russian translations from American English are tainted with the same problem. Some short conceptions need too many words to be translated because of the cultural background most of all. Sometimes translators use templates for common phrases that might be more creative but they aren't. I mean pulp fiction and dialogues.
Translation of what is not in the text is the most difficult thing.
I can't agree that Russian is descript and English is non-descrit. It is up to the master of watercolor which technique to choose. The complexity of technique I found in Gulliver Travels and the longevity of sentences combined with obsolete language were a hurdle that I coudn't overcome for 20 pages because I forgot the beginning of every sentence.
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#56
Just in case you are having trouble stomaching the latest Eco-Wacko scare fantasy at Fox, there are two brand new David Weber novels out there.

The first one, A Beautiful Friendship, is the prequel of the Honor Harrington series, in which Honor's ancestor is the first human to contact treecats. I just started on it, and haven't had a chance to get far yet. But it should be good.

I have the advanced reader's copy, in "ePub", "pdg", and "mobi" format.

The second one, How Firm A Foundation, is number five of the Safehold series. I have a copy in only "epub" format.

Anyone wishing a copy/copies can let me know and I'll e-mail a copy to them.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________
"INSIDE EVERY PROGRESSIVE IS A TOTALITARIAN SCREAMING TO GET OUT" - David Horowitz

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#57
I love Weber's "Safehold" series.
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#58
(01-27-2011, 07:40 PM)Green Wrote: Russian translations from American English are tainted with the same problem. Some short conceptions need too many words to be translated because of the cultural background most of all. Sometimes translators use templates for common phrases that might be more creative but they aren't. I mean pulp fiction and dialogues.
Translation of what is not in the text is the most difficult thing.
I can't agree that Russian is descript and English is non-descrit. It is up to the master of watercolor which technique to choose. The complexity of technique I found in Gulliver Travels and the longevity of sentences combined with obsolete language were a hurdle that I coudn't overcome for 20 pages because I forgot the beginning of every sentence.

I produce many manuals in multiple languages, and galley copy from the translation bureau for one project is often picked up for a separate project using the same language. Interesting that the translation for the new project for the same words may be entirely different. Something as simple as "Slide" may come back as "Toboggan." Next project it may be presented as, "Coullisant." Same usage, same illustration, even - but varying copy. I think the person doing the translation becomes an arbiter of the best way to explain something - and you get stuck with the vocabulary and personality of the interpreter more than anything.

An editor in English to English behaves the same way. You want to say, "Using Lombardi's words that “Winning isn’t everything — it’s the only thing!”...He wanted them to play with the desire to win; but whether they won or lost, it was the honor and courage of their play that he was most proud of. For any coaches to use his words to justify their own ambitions and abuse of young players is a tragedy"; was corrected by My editor brother, Ron, by replacing "tragedy" with "travesty." Either word works - but "travesty" works better - and very importantly, retains the pace and spirit.

What you get with any translation is a mere approximation of the original author's concepts and vocabulary. If a book is translated poorly, check around - there may be a better version somewhere.
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#59
Steel Bonnets, by George MacDonald Fraser - it's about the Border Reivers.

Same guy who gave us the incredible Flashman series as well.
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#60
Re-reading A Beautiful Friendship again, thanks to John's epub and the cover art which I liked. I have to finish it now to see if it is the same version I already read - or has additions. Noting the publishing date, I think it must be new.

Also halfway through the Honor Harrington series as well. She's just about to be captured by Tourville, and then tortured by Cordelia Ransome. (I reread things all the time - and always find something new I glossed over before.)
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